Ep. 183: Leah Wellbaum/Joe Karg

  • by Andy Beckerman
  • on Beginnings

It’s time for Beginnings, the podcast where writer and performer Andy Beckerman talks to the comedians, writers, filmmakers and musicians he admires about their earliest creative experiences and the numerous ways in which a creative life can unfold.

On today’s show, I talk to musician Leah Wellbaum. Originally from Brookline, Massachusetts, Leah’s been playing music for a long time. She started out playing with blues groups in college, but it’s her most recent band Slothrust that’s been getting a lot of attention lately, and deservedly so. Their debut album Of Course You Do is great (maybe you heard one of their songs under the credits of the awesome FX show You’re the Worst), and it’s available now on Ba Da Bing Records.

Back in September, Leah came over to the Harlem studio to discuss synaesthesia, murder-worries, children’s toys, teen sex comedies & learning about sex from them, consent, artistic households, absurdity, and letting go.

And then in the second half, I talk to my friend Joe Karg! Joe is a fantastic artist who created the comic El Grande, and does album art for Comedy Central and just started doing weekly posters for the well-known UCB show Whiplash. And in this part, Joe continues a topic I started with Leah and teaches me about letting go, which comes easy to him, and is super-difficult for me. Joe’s great!

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Tomorrow I’ve got a bonus episode for you with Leah Wellbaum from the band Slothrust. I’m really loving their album Of Course You Do (they also did the song under the credits for You’re the Worst), and Leah stops by the Beginnings Studio to talk about learning about sex from teen sex comedies, and she also reveals that she gave someone my address just in case I turned out to be a murderer and she disappeared after the interview.  High-res

Tomorrow I’ve got a bonus episode for you with Leah Wellbaum from the band Slothrust. I’m really loving their album Of Course You Do (they also did the song under the credits for You’re the Worst), and Leah stops by the Beginnings Studio to talk about learning about sex from teen sex comedies, and she also reveals that she gave someone my address just in case I turned out to be a murderer and she disappeared after the interview. 

Ep. 182: The Lucas Bros./Mike Pace

  • by Andy Beckerman
  • on Beginnings

It’s time for Beginnings, the podcast where writer and performer Andy Beckerman talks to the comedians, writers, filmmakers and musicians he admires about their earliest creative experiences and the numerous ways in which a creative life can unfold.

On today’s show, I talk to Keith and Kenny Lucas AKA The Lucas Bros. Born in Newark and raised in North Carolina, Keith and Kenny were on the path to become lawyers before turning to comedy. And thankfully their choice has been validated by a great deal of success. A few years ago, they debuted their stand-up on Late Night, and since then have created Lucas Bros. Moving Co. for Fox’s ADHD, they’ve appeared in the hit film 22 Jump Street, and they’ve written and performed on truTV’s new sketch show Friends of the People.

Right before heading off to LA for a month, I stopped by Keith and Kenny’s Brooklyn apartment where we talked about “ghetto candy”, Newark, the crack epidemic, mythology, wrestling, the South vs. the North, twin echo chambers, black sitcoms and leaving law school.

Plus in the second half of the show, I talk to my good friend Mike Pace. Mike is a great musician and was formerly the lead singer of Oxford Collapse and is currently the principal songwriter for Mike Pace and the Child Actors, whose debut album Best Boy will be released next year on Self-Starter Foundation. Mike is a fan of professional wrestling, and he joins me in Andy’s Learnin’ Corner to explain what the appeal is as well as how the WWE formed and what the heck kayfabe is.

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Uh, hello? Are you ready for a great episode tomorrow with Keith and Kenny Lucas AKA The Lucas Bros.? Fresh off of 22 Jump Street and just before their new truTV sketch show Friends of the People starts, Keith and Kenny came on the show to talk to me about what it was like growing up in Newark at the height of the crack epidemic, the appeal of wrestling and why law school was shit. Subscribe so you don’t have to manually d/l this baby tomorrow! High-res

Uh, hello? Are you ready for a great episode tomorrow with Keith and Kenny Lucas AKA The Lucas Bros.? Fresh off of 22 Jump Street and just before their new truTV sketch show Friends of the People starts, Keith and Kenny came on the show to talk to me about what it was like growing up in Newark at the height of the crack epidemic, the appeal of wrestling and why law school was shit. Subscribe so you don’t have to manually d/l this baby tomorrow!

Ep. 181: Gillian Robespierre/Halle Kiefer

  • by Andy Beckerman
  • on Beginnings

It’s time for Beginnings, the podcast where writer and performer Andy Beckerman talks to the comedians, writers, filmmakers and musicians he admires about their earliest creative experiences and the numerous ways in which a creative life can unfold.

On today’s show, I talk to writer and director Gillian Robespierre. A New York native, Gillian grew up in Stuyvesant Town in Manhattan. Her father made films for many years, and that, as well as a number of other reasons, drew Gillian to become a filmmaker herself. In 2009, she made a short called Obvious Child, which she then expanded into a feature-length film starring Jenny Slate. This debuted earlier this year at Sundance, where it garnered the Red Crown Producer’s Award, and since its wide release, it’s garnered both critical and popular accolades. Not only that, but just this week, it was released on DVD!

Back in September, Gillian came over to the Beginnings studio to talk about having a sweet tooth, shooting your thesis film at a flophouse, making the decision to grow up, nostalgia, sentimentality & logic, having dyslexia, shame, pot and Stuyvesant Town & class consciousness.

Also, in the second half of the show, I talk to my friend, and previous Beginnings guest Halle Kiefer. Halle’s a comedy writer, who most recently wrote for truTV’s new sketch show Friends of the People, and we have a wide-ranging and philosophical talk about abortions, the nature of truth and whether Aidan was really good for Carrie or not.

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People! For real, tomorrow’s guest is Gillian Robespierre, the co-writer and director of Obvious Child, this summer’s indie hit. If you didn’t see it, a) you should and b) you should listen to her on tomorrow’s episode for one of the most effortless and charming conversations I’ve had in a while. Subscribe and you’ll never miss an episode! High-res

People! For real, tomorrow’s guest is Gillian Robespierre, the co-writer and director of Obvious Child, this summer’s indie hit. If you didn’t see it, a) you should and b) you should listen to her on tomorrow’s episode for one of the most effortless and charming conversations I’ve had in a while. Subscribe and you’ll never miss an episode!

Ep.180: Charlie Todd/Jesse Neil

  • by Andy Beckerman
  • on Beginnings

It’s time for Beginnings, the podcast where writer and performer Andy Beckerman talks to the comedians, writers, filmmakers and musicians he admires about their earliest creative experiences and the numerous ways in which a creative life can unfold.

On today’s show, I talk to improvisor Charlie Todd. Originally from Columbia, South Carolina, Charlie moved to New York after college and since 2001 has been performing at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre. At UCB, Charlie created the comedy wrestling league UCBW and was also a part of the long-running house team Reuben Williams, which later morphed into The Curfew. They perform every Saturday night at the theatre. Charlie is also the founder of the famous prank collective Improv Everywhere, and has produced, directed, documented and performed in the group’s work for over thirteen years.

At the end of August, Charlie came over to the Harlem studio to talk about golf, family businesses, escaping the path you’re on, conservative parents, dating your students, first crushes, private school, competition, pranks, playground games, making your own rules, and DIY and indie rock.

Plus in the second half of the show, I talk to my friend Jesse Neil. Jesse is a performer at UCB and his show The Keith and Jesse Show is currently running at the theatre and is one of the funniest sketch shows I’ve seen in ages. Jesse drops by and we continue a discussion I started with Charlie about being anti-authority. Find out why two white suburban kids think most cops are pieces of shit!

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Ep. 179: Nate Hill/Andy Rocco

  • by Andy Beckerman
  • on Beginnings

It’s time for Beginnings, the podcast where writer and performer Andy Beckerman talks to the comedians, writers, filmmakers and musicians he admires about their earliest creative experiences and the numerous ways in which a creative life can unfold.

On today’s show I talk to artist Nate Hill. Originally from Florida, Nate moved to New York to perform art in a city that would be receptive to his works. And Nate’s works are pretty amazing. Coming out of the same public performance tradition that gave birth to artists like Joey Skaggs and even some of the early Upright Citizens Brigade pranks, Nate’s art is practiced outside the usual (suffocating?) boundaries of the fine art world. Performances like Death Bear, where Nate, dressed in a large black bear mask will come and take away items your ex has left behind, or Trophy Scarves, where he draped white women around his neck like fashion accessories, show how Nate can take serious emotional, racial and gender issues and examine them from a playful place.

Back in August, Nate came over to the Beginnings studio on a beautiful Thursday afternoon to talk about losing your virginity, funny art, a contentious relationship with your dad, growing up in Florida, cops, empathy, manipulating people, having an artistic disposition, and channeling humanity’s dark side.

Plus in the second half of the show, I have a wonderful and wide-ranging talk with my friend Andy Rocco. Andy is a writer and performer and UCB stalwart. He hosts the variety show Underground Americana at the Chelsea theatre and produces the insane character show The Tony Show at UCB East among many other things. Andy and I continue the talk about empathy and manipulating people, and Andy challenges my 18th century ethical beliefs.

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Tomorrow on Beginning I talk to performance artist Nate Hill. 
Now, here’s the thing. Nate’s not a famous comedian, so I feel like people are going to sleep on this episode. I get it. If Maron interviews Comedian X who was a road comic in the 80s, I skip that too. But Nate’s an interesting dude, who does funny public “pranks” or public performance artpieces - I dunno what I’d call them exactly, but they’re worth hearing about, as well as Nate’s thoughts on empathy and art, and what it was like growing up in Florida, as well as how he works out his issues with his estranged dad through his art. It’s a good talk, and I hope you tune in and also subscribe to the show as well! High-res

Tomorrow on Beginning I talk to performance artist Nate Hill. 

Now, here’s the thing. Nate’s not a famous comedian, so I feel like people are going to sleep on this episode. I get it. If Maron interviews Comedian X who was a road comic in the 80s, I skip that too. But Nate’s an interesting dude, who does funny public “pranks” or public performance artpieces - I dunno what I’d call them exactly, but they’re worth hearing about, as well as Nate’s thoughts on empathy and art, and what it was like growing up in Florida, as well as how he works out his issues with his estranged dad through his art. It’s a good talk, and I hope you tune in and also subscribe to the show as well!